Chrome 2001
.
Aetna Intelihealth InteliHealth Aetna Intelihealth Aetna Intelihealth
 
.
. .

   Advertisement
Carepass Ad Carepass Ad .
Chrome 2001
Chrome 2001
Health News Health News
.
Text Messages May Double Smoker's Odds of Quitting
June 06, 2014

 

FRIDAY, June 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Text messages providing tips, reminders and advice can help smokers quit, according to a new study.

Researchers found that this type of cellphone program doubles the chances that a smoker will kick the habit.

"Text messages seem to give smokers the constant reminders they need to stay focused on quitting," said the study's lead author, Lorien Abroms. She is an associate professor of prevention and community health at George Washington University's Milken Institute School of Public Health, in Washington D.C.

"However, additional studies must be done to confirm this result and to look at how these programs work when coupled with other established anti-smoking therapies," she said in a university news release.

Traditional methods to help people stop smoking include phone counseling and nicotine replacement therapies. The study's authors pointed out that research suggests text messaging on cellphones could also be effective.

These programs, such as Text2Quit and SmokefreeTXT, work by sending advice, reminders and tips to smokers' cellphones. These texts are intended to help people manage their cigarette cravings and stick to a set quit date. More than 75,000 people in the United States have enrolled in these programs through quit lines, note the researchers.

The study, published June 6 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine online, involved 503 smokers who were recruited from the Internet. Smokers were randomly assigned to participate in a text-messaging program or receive self-help material designed to help smokers quit.

Smokers involved in the texting program were able to respond to their texts and ask for additional help or pick a new quit date. Those who faced a strong urge to smoke could send a text to receive a tip or a game that could help them overcome their craving for a cigarette.

After six months, the researchers found those using the text-messaging program were much more likely to quit than the group that received self-help material. The study showed that 11 percent of smokers using the text-messaging program quit and were still not smoking when the study ended. In contrast, only 5 percent of those who did not use the text-messaging program did the same.

The researchers took saliva samples from the smokers who said they quit to confirm they actually stopped smoking. After screening the samples for traces of a nicotine byproduct, they found the quit rates for people with confirmed abstinence after six months was still twice as high as the other smoking group.

Although text-messaging programs show promise as a tool to help people quit smoking, the study's authors pointed out their research involved people who were already motivated to quit and were looking for help. More studies are needed, they added, to see how these programs work for people who are less motivated and not as technologically advanced.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides more information on quitting smoking.
Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


SOURCE: George Washington University, news release, June 6, 2014....

InteliHealth
.
.
.
.
.
More News
InteliHealth .
.
General Health News
Today's News
Today In Health History
This Week In Health
Addiction News
Allergy News
Alzheimer's News
Arthritis News
Asthma News
Babies News
Breast Cancer News
Bronchitis News
Cancer News
Caregiving News
Cervical Cancer News
Children's Health News
Cholesterol News
Complementary & Alternative Medicine News
Dental/Oral Health News
Depression News
Diabetes News
Ear, Nose And Throat News
Environmental Health News
Eye News
Fitness News
Genetics News
Headache News
Health Policy News
Heart Attack News
Heart Failure News
Heart Health News
HIV/AIDS News
Infectious Diseases News
Influenza News
Lung Cancer News
Medication News
Men's Health News
Mental Health News
Multiple Sclerosis News
Nutrition News
Parkinson's News
Pregnancy News
Prevention News
Prostate Cancer News
Schizophrenia
Senior Health News
Sexual/Reproductive Health News
Sexual dysfunction
Sleep News
STDs News
Stroke News
Tobacco Cessation News
Weight Management News
Women's Health News
.
.
.
.
InteliHealth
    Print Printer-friendly format    
   
.  
This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify.
.