Chrome 2001
.
Aetna Intelihealth InteliHealth Aetna Intelihealth Aetna Intelihealth
 
.
. .

   Advertisement
Carepass Ad Carepass Ad .
Chrome 2001
Chrome 2001
Health News Health News
.
C-Section May Raise Odds of Failed Pregnancy Later: Study
July 01, 2014

 

TUESDAY, July 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A cesarean delivery might put women at a slightly increased risk for ectopic pregnancy and stillbirth in future pregnancies, a new study finds.

However, the risk for either complication is still very low, researchers said.

The researchers analyzed data from nearly 833,000 first-time mothers in Denmark. Those whose baby was delivered by cesarean section had a 14 percent higher rate of stillbirth in their next pregnancy than those who had a vaginal delivery. A stillbirth is described as the death of a fetus at more than 20 weeks of gestation.

That works out to an absolute risk increase of 0.03 percent. That means that for every 3,000 cesarean deliveries, there would be one extra stillbirth in future pregnancies, the researchers explained.

They also found that women who had a cesarean delivery for their first baby were 9 percent more likely to have a future ectopic pregnancy than those who had a vaginal delivery.

That's an absolute increased risk of 0.1 percent, which means that for every 1,000 cesarean deliveries, there would be one extra ectopic pregnancy in future pregnancies.

In an ectopic pregnancy, the fertilized egg grows in the fallopian tubes or other locations outside the uterus. It typically results in loss of the fetus and can be fatal for the mother.

Having a cesarean delivery for a first baby did not increase women's risk of miscarriage in future pregnancies, according to the researchers at University College Cork in Ireland and Aarhus University in Denmark. A miscarriage is generally described as the spontaneous loss of a fetus before 20 weeks of pregnancy.

The study appears in the July 1 issue of the journal PLoS Medicine.

"The findings of the current study are particularly important for expectant mothers as well as health care professionals as cesarean section rates are increasing significantly worldwide," study author Louise Kenny said in a journal news release.

While the study finds an association between c-sections and failed pregnancies, it does not prove a direct cause-and-effect relationship.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development has more about cesarean delivery.
Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


SOURCE: PLoS Medicine, news release, July 1, 2014...

InteliHealth
.
.
.
.
.
More News
InteliHealth .
.
General Health News
Today's News
Today In Health History
This Week In Health
Addiction News
Allergy News
Alzheimer's News
Arthritis News
Asthma News
Babies News
Breast Cancer News
Bronchitis News
Cancer News
Caregiving News
Cervical Cancer News
Children's Health News
Cholesterol News
Complementary & Alternative Medicine News
Dental/Oral Health News
Depression News
Diabetes News
Ear, Nose And Throat News
Environmental Health News
Eye News
Fitness News
Genetics News
Headache News
Health Policy News
Heart Attack News
Heart Failure News
Heart Health News
HIV/AIDS News
Infectious Diseases News
Influenza News
Lung Cancer News
Medication News
Men's Health News
Mental Health News
Multiple Sclerosis News
Nutrition News
Parkinson's News
Pregnancy News
Prevention News
Prostate Cancer News
Schizophrenia
Senior Health News
Sexual/Reproductive Health News
Sexual dysfunction
Sleep News
STDs News
Stroke News
Tobacco Cessation News
Weight Management News
Women's Health News
.
.
.
.
InteliHealth
    Print Printer-friendly format    
   
.  
This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify.
.