Chrome 2001
.
Aetna Intelihealth InteliHealth Aetna Intelihealth Aetna Intelihealth
 
.
. .

   Advertisement
Carepass Ad Carepass Ad .
Chrome 2001
Chrome 2001
InteliHealth
Ask the Doc
4464
Ask the Doc
Ask The Expert
Harvard Medical School
Image of a cadeusus
. .
General Medical Questions
.
Question : When I visit my doctor, my readings are always high at first. The doctor has me relax for about 10 minutes and the repeat is at the top of normal (140/90 or close to it). Do I have hypertension that needs to be treated?
.
.
.
The Trusted Source
.
.
Howard LeWine, M.D.

Howard LeWine, M.D., is chief editor of Internet Publishing, Harvard Health Publications. He is a clinical instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital. Dr. LeWine has been a primary care internist and teacher of internal medicine since 1978.

.
.
February 24, 2012
.

A:

Yes, you can get valuable information from measuring your blood pressure at home.

I suspect you have “white coat” hypertension. This is when your blood pressure goes up when you see the doctor. But it may be well within the normal range at home. You won’t know for sure unless you get a home blood pressure monitor.

If you have normal blood pressure readings at home, you probably don’t need to take blood pressure medicine. But if you have high readings at home, your doctor would want you to pay more attention to your diet, including how much salt you have. He or she might also prescribe a low dose blood pressure medicine.

I recommend an automated electronic blood pressure monitor. These devices are much easier to use than mechanical cuffs. They don’t cost too much and are quite accurate.

Some tips for taking your blood pressure at home:

  • Relax for at least 15 minutes before measuring your blood pressure. Don’t smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol or eat during this time.
  • Choose a quiet place to measure your blood pressure. Sit in a comfortable chair that supports your back and arms, and make sure your feet are on the floor.
  • Don’t move or talk while checking your blood pressure.
  • If one of your arms has consistently higher readings than the other, use this arm to record your blood pressure. And let your doctor know about the difference. Blood pressure is usually the same (or very close) in both arms. Doctors typically measure BP in the left arm.
  • Position the cuff roughly at the level of your heart. Your arm should be supported by a table or the arm of your chair.
  • Try checking your BP at different times on different days. Your blood pressure may go up and down over the day. This will help you get a sense of the pattern.
  • If you are taking more than one measurement at a sitting, wait 5 minutes in between.
  • Write down all of your readings to review with your doctor.

.

4581, 8465, 8466, 8467, 8481,
 
8467

.
.
InteliHealth
.
Ask A Question
.
.
InteliHealth
Do You Have A Question?
.
. . .
.
Ask The Expert Archives
Topics
.
InteliHealth
.
InteliHealth

    Print Printer-friendly format    
   
dmtatd
dmtATD
dmtatd
126747
InteliHealth
1998-05-15
f
InteliHealth
NULL
411, 4464, 4581, 4582, 7991, 7992, 7995, 7996, 7997, 8122, 8438, 8463, 8464, 8465, 8466, 8467, 8468, 8469, 8470, 8471, 8472, 8473, 8474, 8475, 8476, 8477, 8479, 8480, 8481, 8482, 8483, 8484, 8486, 8487, 8488, 8489, 8490, 8760, 14219, 20807, 21346, 21349, 21351, 23926, 23938, 24017, 24025, 24075, 24151, 24510, 24519, 24549, 24869, 24878, 25107, 25518, 25646, 25968, 29367, 29516, 29595, 48666, 48812, 59367,
4581
.
.  
This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify.
.