Chrome 2001
.
Aetna Intelihealth InteliHealth Aetna Intelihealth Aetna Intelihealth
 
.
. .

   Advertisement
Carepass Ad Carepass Ad .
Chrome 2001
Chrome 2001
InteliHealth
Ask the Doc
4464
Ask the Doc
Ask The Expert
Harvard Medical School
Image of a cadeusus
. .
General Medical Questions
.
Question : My leucocytes count is 7700, and lymphocyte is 51%. Is it leukemia?
.
.
.
The Trusted Source
.
.
Howard LeWine, M.D.

Howard LeWine, M.D., is chief editor of Internet Publishing, Harvard Health Publications. He is a clinical instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital. Dr. LeWine has been a primary care internist and teacher of internal medicine since 1978.

.
.
June 26, 2014
.

 

Your lymphocyte percent is high. But that alone does not mean you have leukemia.

The lymphocyte count on a blood sample is measured as a percent of the total number of white blood cells. In addition to lymphocytes, there are other types of white blood cells, including granulocytes. These are usually the main white cell type in a blood sample. Lymphocytes are next, with a range of 15% to 40%.

Your blood test report gives the percent of lymphocytes. But the absolute number of lymphocytes per cubic centimeter of blood is actually more helpful. You can get this count by taking the total white blood cell count and multiplying it by the percentage of lymphocytes.

Multiplying your total white blood cell count times 51% equals 3,927 lymphocytes.

A high lymphocyte count is defined as an absolute lymphocyte count of 4,000 or greater. Doctors call this lymphocytosis. Your absolute lymphocyte count is close to that number, but still below 4,000.

So why might your percent of lymphocytes be high? The most common cause is a recent viral infection, such as a cold or the flu. But you could feel perfectly fine and have this test result.

It’s possible that you always have a lymphocyte count around this range. If so, it makes any type of leukemia less likely.

If it is much higher than it used to be, it may be time to see a blood specialist (hematologist). Of the blood conditions, chronic lymphocytic leukemia would be the most likely type. And this condition has an excellent prognosis.

.
.
InteliHealth
.
Ask A Question
.
.
InteliHealth
Do You Have A Question?
.
. . .
.
Ask The Expert Archives
Topics
.
InteliHealth
.
InteliHealth

    Print Printer-friendly format    
   
dmtatd
dmtATD
dmtatd
126747
InteliHealth
1998-05-15
f
InteliHealth
NULL
411, 4464, 4581, 4582, 7991, 7992, 7995, 7996, 7997, 8122, 8438, 8463, 8464, 8465, 8466, 8467, 8468, 8469, 8470, 8471, 8472, 8473, 8474, 8475, 8476, 8477, 8479, 8480, 8481, 8482, 8483, 8484, 8486, 8487, 8488, 8489, 8490, 8760, 14219, 20807, 21346, 21349, 21351, 23926, 23938, 24017, 24025, 24075, 24151, 24510, 24519, 24549, 24869, 24878, 25107, 25518, 25646, 25968, 29367, 29516, 29595, 48666, 48812, 59367,
4581
.
.  
This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify.
.