Chrome 2001
.
Aetna Intelihealth InteliHealth Aetna Intelihealth Aetna Intelihealth
 
.
. .
.
Chrome 2001
Chrome 2001
InteliHealth
Ask the Doc
4464
Ask the Doc
Ask The Expert
Harvard Medical School
Image of a cadeusus
. .
General Medical Questions
.
Question : My 13-year-old daughter has been diagnosed with a hemangioma. It looks like a wart, and about the size of a pencil eraser. It’s just above her left armpit on her shoulder. What would cause this to happen? Is there anything we should be concerned with? ...
.
.
.
The Trusted Source
.
.
Howard LeWine, M.D.

Henry H. Bernstein, D.O., is a senior lecturer in Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. In addition, he is chief of General Academic Pediatrics at Children's Hospital at Dartmouth and professor of pediatrics at Dartmouth Medical School. He is the former associate chief of General Pediatrics and director of Primary Care at Children's Hospital Boston.

.
.
April 26, 2013
.

It sounds like your daughter has what dermatologists call a “cherry hemangioma.” Fortunately, it is not a worrisome condition. Nothing that you or your daughter did made the hemangioma appear. In fact, some people are just more likely to have them than others.A hemangioma is a benign (non-cancerous) collection of blood vessels that grow right under the skin and make a red bump.There are several kinds of hemangiomas. You may have seen babies with red patches on their faces or other parts of their bodies, so-called “strawberry hemangiomas.” These are present at birth or appear in the first few months of life. Then, they usually go away on their own without any treatment.On the other hand, “cherry hemangiomas,” like the one your daughter has, develop in older children and adults. And they do not usually go away by themselves.There is nothing dangerous about having a cherry hemangioma, but doctors often recommend removing it. Why? The hemangioma is made up of blood vessels. And any slight trauma to that spot can cause the hemangioma to bleed. And some people are bothered by having a red spot on their skin, and want it removed for cosmetic reasons.Different options are available to remove a hemangioma. These include electric cautery (burning the blood vessels) and excision (cutting the hemangioma out). People who develop one cherry hemangioma are likely to develop more in the future. So you and your daughter should talk with her doctor or a dermatologist about the right treatment.

.
.
InteliHealth
.
Ask A Question
.
.
InteliHealth
Do You Have A Question?
.
. . .
.
Ask The Expert Archives
Topics
.
InteliHealth
.
InteliHealth

    Print Printer-friendly format    
   
dmtatd
dmtATD
dmtatd
126747
InteliHealth
1998-05-15
f
InteliHealth
NULL
411, 4464, 4581, 4582, 7991, 7992, 7995, 7996, 7997, 8122, 8438, 8463, 8464, 8465, 8466, 8467, 8468, 8469, 8470, 8471, 8472, 8473, 8474, 8475, 8476, 8477, 8479, 8480, 8481, 8482, 8483, 8484, 8486, 8487, 8488, 8489, 8490, 8760, 14219, 20807, 21346, 21349, 21351, 23926, 23938, 24017, 24025, 24075, 24151, 24510, 24519, 24549, 24869, 24878, 25107, 25518, 25646, 25968, 29367, 29516, 29595, 48666, 48812, 59367,
4581
.
.  
This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify.
.