Chrome 2001
.
Aetna Intelihealth InteliHealth Aetna Intelihealth Aetna Intelihealth
 
.
. .

   Advertisement
Carepass Ad Carepass Ad .
Chrome 2001
Chrome 2001
InteliHealth
Ask the Doc
4464
Ask the Doc
Ask The Expert
Harvard Medical School
Image of a cadeusus
. .
General Medical Questions
.
Question : I’ve been taking temazepam nightly for three months. My doctor is afraid I’ll become dependent. Do you have any suggestions?
.
.
.
The Trusted Source
.
.
Howard LeWine, M.D.

Michael Craig Miller, M.D Michael Craig Miller, M.D., is Senior Editor of Mental Health Publishing at Harvard Health Publications. He is an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Miller is in clinical practice at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, where he has been on staff for more than 25 years.

.
.
September 28, 2012
.

A:

There are many effective short-term sleep aids. But over time, the sedating effect can wear off. You may also develop “rebound insomnia” when you stop the medicine.

The end result? The medicine stops working, but you can’t give it up. Some people don’t run into this problem. But there are other side effects. For example, sleep drugs may make you less mentally sharp.

I suggest you review your situation carefully before committing to long-term use of sleep medicine.

Consider whether alcohol, caffeine, and/or tobacco are making it harder to get to sleep. Some medicines (for hypertension or asthma) and some illnesses (heart or lung disease) can be culprits. Review these with your doctor.

If you are depressed, anxious, or stressed, get treatment. Some antidepressants can improve sleep patterns.

You can try to improve your “sleep hygiene.” Avoid alcohol in the evening and coffee after noon. If you smoke, try to stop. Exercise more, but not too close to bedtime. Also, don’t eat too much before going to bed (although a small snack is fine).

In the evening, find a way to settle yourself and relax — take a bath, for example. Cut down on drinking fluids at night so you don’t have to get up to urinate in the night.

Go to bed only when you’re sleepy and never to watch TV, read, or eat in the bedroom. Get out of bed if it takes you more than 10 minutes to fall asleep. Get up at the same time every morning.

None of this is easy. But evidence says these techniques work. You can keep the sleep aid prescription handy for occasional use.

.

4581, 8466, 8471, 8488,
alcohol
8471

.
.
InteliHealth
.
Ask A Question
.
.
InteliHealth
Do You Have A Question?
.
. . .
.
Ask The Expert Archives
Topics
.
InteliHealth
.
InteliHealth

    Print Printer-friendly format    
   
dmtatd
dmtATD
dmtatd
126747
InteliHealth
1998-05-15
f
InteliHealth
NULL
411, 4464, 4581, 4582, 7991, 7992, 7995, 7996, 7997, 8122, 8438, 8463, 8464, 8465, 8466, 8467, 8468, 8469, 8470, 8471, 8472, 8473, 8474, 8475, 8476, 8477, 8479, 8480, 8481, 8482, 8483, 8484, 8486, 8487, 8488, 8489, 8490, 8760, 14219, 20807, 21346, 21349, 21351, 23926, 23938, 24017, 24025, 24075, 24151, 24510, 24519, 24549, 24869, 24878, 25107, 25518, 25646, 25968, 29367, 29516, 29595, 48666, 48812, 59367,
4581
.
.  
This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify.
.