Chrome 2001
.
Aetna Intelihealth InteliHealth Aetna Intelihealth Aetna Intelihealth
 
.
. .
.
Chrome 2001
Chrome 2001
InteliHealth
Ask the Doc
4464
Ask the Doc
Ask The Expert
Harvard Medical School
Image of a cadeusus
. .
General Medical Questions
.
Question : I have celiac disease, which has weakened my bones. But I’m male. I thought thin bones were primarily a problem for women? And why should a disease of my intestines affect my bones? Finally, what can I do about it?
.
.
.
The Trusted Source
.
.
Howard LeWine, M.D.

Howard LeWine, M.D., is chief editor of Internet Publishing, Harvard Health Publications. He is a clinical instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital. Dr. LeWine has been a primary care internist and teacher of internal medicine since 1978.

.
.
May 23, 2013
.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease. The immune system attacks the small intestine. It’s triggered by gluten, a protein found in barley, rye and wheat. Oats may also be a problem. But only if small amounts of the other grains get mixed with them during milling or at some other time.

Celiac disease can lead to thin bones (osteopenia or osteoporosis). Here’s how. The immune system attack on the small intestine injures the inner lining. The result is that many important nutrients, including vitamin D, don’t absorb as well. This can lead to vitamin D deficiency. You need adequate vitamin D to maintain healthy bones.

Thin bones are more common in women. But it’s an important problem for men, too. In fact, a 60-year-old man has a one-in-four chance of developing a fracture from thin bones before he dies. That’s true even if he doesn’t have celiac disease.

You need to take a vitamin D supplement. Talk with your doctor about the right dose for you. Your diet should be loaded with calcium-rich foods. Also, look for drinks that are fortified with calcium, such as certain brands of orange juice.

Getting into an exercise routine that includes weight-bearing activity is a must. Jogging, walking, climbing stairs — anything that gets your bones and muscles working against gravity is weight-bearing activity.

If the combination of exercise and a vitamin D doesn’t improve your bone density, then you may be a candidate for a prescription drug. There are several good ones to choose from.  And they work as well in men as they do in women.

Whatever approach you and your doctor decide to take, I urge you to take action sooner rather than later. Taking a few pills and following an exercise program can go a long way toward protecting you from painful and disabling fractures.

.
.
InteliHealth
.
Ask A Question
.
.
InteliHealth
Do You Have A Question?
.
. . .
.
Ask The Expert Archives
Topics
.
InteliHealth
.
InteliHealth

    Print Printer-friendly format    
   
dmtatd
dmtATD
dmtatd
126747
InteliHealth
1998-05-15
f
InteliHealth
NULL
411, 4464, 4581, 4582, 7991, 7992, 7995, 7996, 7997, 8122, 8438, 8463, 8464, 8465, 8466, 8467, 8468, 8469, 8470, 8471, 8472, 8473, 8474, 8475, 8476, 8477, 8479, 8480, 8481, 8482, 8483, 8484, 8486, 8487, 8488, 8489, 8490, 8760, 14219, 20807, 21346, 21349, 21351, 23926, 23938, 24017, 24025, 24075, 24151, 24510, 24519, 24549, 24869, 24878, 25107, 25518, 25646, 25968, 29367, 29516, 29595, 48666, 48812, 59367,
4581
.
.  
This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify.
.