Prevention - Kids Sports Injuries

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Prevention - Kids Sports Injuries

Mental Health
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Preventing and Treating Kids' Sports Injuries
Prevention - Kids Sports Injuries
Prevention - Kids Sports Injuries
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Prompt and proper treatment of kids' sports injuries is important. But wouldn't it be better if they never got hurt in the first place?
200163
InteliHealth
2011-09-06
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InteliHealth Medical Content
2013-03-11
Reviewed by the Faculty of Harvard Medical School
Prevention

Prompt and proper treatment of kids' sports injuries is important. But wouldn't it be better if they never got hurt in the first place? While no one can offer you a guarantee of injury-free play, these tips might keep your child in the game:

  • Schedule a preseason medical exam (ideally six to eight weeks before the season starts) to help identify problems or pre-existing injuries that could be made worse by playing sports.
  • Make sure your child is in shape before playing. Lack of physical conditioning (being out of shape) is a major contributor to overuse and sudden injuries.
  • Consider weight training. It can begin as young as 7 years old, under adult supervision. Stronger muscles absorb more impact and protect against injury in children and adolescents.
  • Coaches should encourage safe play by enforcing rules and discouraging aggressive behavior on the field.
  • Don't pressure young athletes to play beyond their ability or temperament. That can lead to overly aggressive play. In addition to being bad for the body, pushing a child can be bad for his spirit.
  • Sort kids by size and physical abilities for a particular sport, rather than strictly by how old they are.
  • Require children to wear protective helmets (and other safety gear). While essential for football and hockey, they also should be worn while biking, skateboarding and in-line skating (sports that are responsible for half of all head injuries in children under age 15). In addition, helmets are now being recommended for downhill skiing, snowboarding and sledding.
  • Be sure young athletes use mouth guards, not only in football but also in soccer and basketball, where head-to-head contact can break teeth.

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Last updated September 06, 2011


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