Phytochemicals

Chrome 2001
.
Aetna Intelihealth InteliHealth Aetna Intelihealth Aetna Intelihealth
 
.
. .
Harvard Medical School
.
Chrome 2001
Chrome 2001
.

Phytochemicals

Nutrition
325
What's in Your Food
Phytochemicals
Phytochemicals
htmJHENutrition.34047
Plants have special chemicals that may fight disease.
34047
InteliHealth
2009-01-02
t
InteliHealth Medical Content
2011-01-02

Reviewed by the Faculty of Harvard Medical School

Phytochemicals

In addition to vitamins, minerals and fiber, plants contain phytochemicals, which protect them from the ravages of sunlight, wind and other damages. (Phyto comes from the Greek word for plant). Although phytochemicals have no known nutritional value, some appear to have disease-fighting properties.

Phytochemicals have been a hot subject of scientific research in recent years. Garlic, soybeans, licorice root, broccoli, carrots and tomatoes are just a few of the many foods that scientists are evaluating. They want to learn if there is any connection between phytochemicals and the prevention and treatment of cancer and other diseases.

Some of the phytochemicals that may be linked to disease prevention include:

  • Capsaicin found in peppers
  • Coumarins in citrus fruit and tomatoes
  • Flavonoids, also in citrus fruit and tomatoes, as well as berries, peppers and carrots
  • Indoles in broccoli and cabbage
  • Isothiocyanates in broccoli and cabbage, as well as mustard and horseradish
  • Lycopene in tomatoes and red grapefruit
  • S-allycysteine in garlic, onions and chives
  • Triterpenoids in licorice root and citrus fruit

 

7095,
cancer
7095
dmtContent
Last updated September 09, 2013


    Print Printer-friendly format    
   
.
.  
This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify.
.