Physical Activity And Minority Women

Chrome 2001
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Aetna Intelihealth InteliHealth Aetna Intelihealth Aetna Intelihealth
 
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Harvard Medical School
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Chrome 2001
Chrome 2001
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Physical Activity And Minority Women

Women's Health
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Specialty Groups
Physical Activity And Minority Women
Physical Activity And Minority Women
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More than 60% of women in the United States do not engage in the recommended amount of physical activity.
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InteliHealth
2012-10-15
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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
2015-10-27

Center for Disease Control logo

Physical Inactivity

Regular physical activity is one of the most important things you can do for your health. It can help:

  • Control your weight
  • Reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease
  • Reduce your risk for type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome
  • Reduce your risk of some cancers
  • Strengthen your bones and muscles
  • Improve your mental health and mood
  • Improve your ability to do daily activities and prevent falls, if you're an older adult
  • Increase your chances of living longer

Physical activity is anything that gets your body moving. According to the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, you need to do two types of physical activity each week to improve your health — aerobic and muscle-strengthening.

If you're not sure about becoming active or boosting your level of physical activity because you're afraid of getting hurt, the good news is that moderate-intensity aerobic activity, like brisk walking, is generally safe for most people.

How much physical activity do adults need? At least:

  • 2 hours and 30 minutes (150 minutes) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (i.e., brisk walking) every week and muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms).

OR

  • 1 hour and 15 minutes (75 minutes) of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity (i.e., jogging or running) every week and muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms).

OR

  • An equivalent mix of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms).

More time equals more health benefits If you go beyond 300 minutes a week of moderate-intensity activity, or 150 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity activity, you'll gain even more health benefits.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

  • Less than half (48%) of all adults meet the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines.
  • The proportion of the U.S. population that reported no leisure-time physical activity decreased from about 31% in 1989 to about 28% in 2000, then decreased to about 25% in 2008.
  • Americans living in the South are more likely to be less physically active than Americans living in the West, Northeast and Midwest regions of the country.
  • More non-Hispanic white adults (22.8%) meet the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for aerobic and muscle-strengthening activity than non-Hispanic black adults (17.3%) and Hispanic adults (14.4%).
  • Men (52.1%) are more likely than women (42.6%) to meet the 2008 Physical Activity Guideline for aerobic activity.
  • Younger adults are more likely to meet the 2008 Physical Activity Guideline for aerobic activity than older adults.

 

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Last updated October 15, 2012


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